The best Lee Remick’s documentary movies

Lee Remick

Lee Remick

14/12/1935- 02/07/1991
Lee Ann Remick (December 14, 1935 – July 2, 1991) was an American actress. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for the 1962 film Days of Wine and Roses, and for the 1966 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play for her Broadway theatre performance in Wait Until Dark. Remick made her film debut in 1957 in A Face in the Crowd. Her other notable film roles include Anatomy of a Murder (1959), Wild River (1960), The Detective (1968), The Omen (1976), and The Europeans (1979). She won Golden Globe Awards for the 1973 TV film The Blue Knight, and for playing the title role in the 1974 miniseries Jennie: Lady Randolph Churchill. For the latter role, she also won the BAFTA TV Award for Best Actress. In April 1991, she received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Description above from the Wikipedia article Lee Remick, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia​

Terror in the Aisles

Terror in the Aisles
6.3/10
  • Genre: DocumentaryHorror
  • Release: 26/10/1984
  • Character: Katherine Thorn (archive footage) (uncredited)
A non-stop roller coaster ride through the scariest moments of the greatest terror films of all time.

James Stewart's Wonderful Life

James Stewart's Wonderful Life
  • Genre: Documentary
  • Release: 22/11/1988
  • Character: Herself
Documentary about James Stewart's long career as an actor and positive personal life.

Follies: In Concert

Follies: In Concert
8.1/10
A backstage documentary film including footage from the legendary 1985 concert performance of Stephen Sondheim's classic musical at Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall. The plot of the musical centers around a reunion of showgirls who appeared in an annual Follies extravaganza when it was staged between the wars.

Gregory Peck: His Own Man

Gregory Peck: His Own Man
7.6/10
Talented and enduring Academy Award-winning star, Gregory Peck, tells how it was when studios ruled and a shy boy from a broken family could rise to become a famous leading man. Unfashionably modest, Peck describes his fascinating journey from early theater roles, through his first films, to Hollywood’s elder statesman.

Related actors